Friday, August 8, 2008

Parliament may stop swearing allegiance to Her Majesty

MPs want to ditch historic oath to Queen

The 22 MPs want the Commons and the Lords to be allowed to swear allegiance to their constituents and the nation rather than to the monarch.

The cross-party group, led by Liberal Democrat MP Norman Baker, says MPs' "principal duty" should be to the people who elected them.


Tony Banks was caught on television crossing his fingers during the oath and Dennis Skinner was heard on a microphone adding "and all who sail on her" after the words Queen Elizabeth.

On another occasion the MP for Bolsover murmured: "I can't swear allegiance to a Queen who refuses to pay taxes."


How incredibly juvenile. And their insistence on pledging an oath to laws they themselves make smacks of the modern tendency to reject genuine religion in favor of making oneself the God of one's own universe, decreeing what is good and what is bad according to one's own whims. Already elected officials (and not just in England) have gotten entirely too full of themselves, believing that God does not exist if He's not allowed to be mentioned in public places, that science can be changed by decree if it conflicts with the goals of the state, and that they can jettison centuries of tradition and build something better in its place. Now they are whining to be allowed to stop making a ritualistic acknowledgement of a symbolic authority above themselves.

As a tangent: this is why governments hate religion. Oh, governments will use religions when it suits them for their own ends, but they still hate them, and historically have usually discouraged them when they could. The very existence of religion means that there is an authority above that of the king/parliament/Supreme Court. Jews and Christians in the Roman Empire were both persecuted for refusing to revere statues of the Emperor or put statues of Zeus et al in their synagogues and Churches. The Soviets actively worked to wipe out religion (and failed, to their own amazement). The Nazi High Command was pagan and intended to eventually replace Christianity with faux Odinism. Wholly secular government is not a thing to be contemplated with pleasure.

Hat tip: An Englishman's Castle.

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